Fort Richardson State Park 10K

First a short history lesson on Fort Richardson. It was officially established in February 1868 in order to provide protection against marauding Comanche and Kiowa Indians. The unstockaded fort occupied some 300 acres along Lost Creek, a tributary of the Trinity River. Eventually fifty-five stone, picket, and cottonwood-lumber buildings were constructed. It was the northernmost army outpost in Texas and for a brief period from 1868 to 1873 it was strategically the most important post in Texas. In 1872 it had the largest garrison (666 officers and men) among military installations in the United States.

It is located just south of Jacksboro, TX and a few miles west of Fort Worth. The Tarrant County Walkers hosted this Volksmarching event. We walked the 10K route. The walk started out on the natural trails in the park.

Volksmarcher with her two companions.

Volksmarcher with her two companions.

Cactus with red and yellow flowers.

Cactus with red and yellow flowers.

Ed on the trail.

Ed on the trail.

Carol waiting for us to catch up.

Carol waiting for us to catch up.

Great rocky area.

Great rocky area.

More of the big rocks.

More of the big rocks.

Stepping stones across lost creek.

Stepping stones across Lost Creek.

Spring from under a rock ledge.

Spring from under a rock ledge.

Just a view of the trail.

Just a view of the trail.

Rocky footing.

Rocky footing.

More nice rocks.

More nice rocks.

Deborah, David and Carol on the trail.

Deborah, David and Carol on the trail.

It eventually reached the fort site.

Marker tells of the Texas National Guard Unit that mobilized here November 1940. for active duty.

Marker tells of the Texas National Guard Unit that mobilized here November 1940. for active duty.

Memorial lists the names of the members of the Lost Battalion.

Memorial lists the names of the members of the Lost Battalion.

Fort Richardson Hospital.

Fort Richardson Hospital.

We took time from the actual Volksmarch to go inside the hospital and look around.

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We headed back outside to continue the walk.

Historical Marker on Fort Richardson Cavalry Post Hospital.

Historical Marker on Fort Richardson Cavalry Post Hospital.

Mortuary out back of the hospital.

Mortuary out back of the hospital.

This is a Rail Road bridge that was built in 1898 to cross Lost Creek about a mile from where it sits today.  It was moved to this field in 1981.

This is a Rail Road bridge that was built in 1898 to cross Lost Creek about a mile from where it sits today. It was moved to this field in 1981.

Information about the ruins.

Information about the ruins.

Flour Mill Ruins

Flour Mill Ruins

Looks like an old quarry location.

Looks like an old quarry location.

Our checkpoint volunteers.

Our checkpoint volunteers.

Historical marker near some cement picnic tables.

Historical marker at some nearby cement picnic tables.

From there the walk continued on the Lost Creek Reservoir State Trail.

Lost Creek

We crossed Lost Creek on a low water crossing.

The trail we were walking on was the old rail bed.

The trail we were currently walking on was the old rail bed.

Eventually we left the trail and continued into Jacksboro.

Pretty and sweet smelling tree.

Pretty and sweet smelling tree.

1940 Courthouse has Six stories.  It is constructed of granite and buff brick .

1940 Courthouse has Six stories. It is constructed of granite and buff brick .

 Marker at the entrance to the cemetery  says earliest graves were from 1859.

Marker at the entrance to the cemetery says earliest graves were from 1859.

Nice rock church.

First United Methodist Church

One end of a mural.

One end of a mural.

Other end of the same mural.

Other end of the same mural.

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The bell and cornerstone from the 1886 Jack County courthouse are now displayed on the front lawn of the current courthouse.

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Building has 1893 above the 2nd story window…. could not find any information on it.

Former Gulf, Texas & Western Railroad Depot.

Former Gulf, Texas & Western Railroad Depot.

Jacksboro Visitor Center

Marker on the restored train depot that is now the Jacksboro Visitor Center.

Carol reading the 1936 Texas Centennial Marker commemorating nearby Fort Richardson.

Carol reading the 1936 Texas Centennial Marker commemorating nearby Fort Richardson.

We continue along HWY 281 back to the State Park.

Returning to the State Park to finish the walk.

Taking a break at the Park entrance.

Texas Historical Marker commemorating the career of Texas Ranger and Confederate soldier, James P. Dosher.

Texas Historical Marker near the ranger station commemorating the career of Texas Ranger and Confederate soldier, James P. Dosher.

Flowers border the lake.

Flowers border the lake.

More cactus blooms.

More cactus blooms.

RR Depot built in 1898 of native stone for the Chicago, Rock Island & Texas Railway.  This depot sits on its original location and is part of Fort Richardson State Park.

RR Depot built in 1898 of native stone for the Chicago, Rock Island & Texas Railway. This depot sits on its original location and is part of Fort Richardson State Park.

Information board about the depot.

Information board about the depot.

Historical Marker on Jacksboro's first RR Depot.

Historical Marker on Jacksboro’s first RR Depot.

Fort Richardson archway entrance.

Fort Richardson archway entrance.

Replica of the Fort Richardson Officer's Quarters.

Replica of the Fort Richardson Officer’s Quarters.

Historical marker on the replica of the Fort Richardson Officer's Quarters.

Historical marker on the replica of the Fort Richardson Officer’s Quarters.

Display inside the Officer's Quarters.

Display inside the Officer’s Quarters.

It was a very enjoyable walk and we didn’t even get rained on.

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About walktx

I am an avid Volksmarcher. I belong to Texas County Walkers in Mesquite.
This entry was posted in Active Retirement, day hike, family fun, hiking, outdoors, Texas, texas state parks, volksmarching, walking and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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