Goliad Seasonal Walking Event – 06/24/16

We walked here back in March. We came back to walk it again with Carol. If you’d like to see pictures from March click here. 

This is an old Masonic lodge near the courthouse square where the walk starts.

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Picture before we started walking.  Lovely buildings across from the courthouse.

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The courthouse clock shows what time we started walking.

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Faded sign on building says furniture store.  It also says coffins.

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The San Antonio River is still up from the rains last month.

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Ed and Carol on the boardwalk.

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Mission Espiritu Santo at Goliad State Park.

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We paid our entry fee and wandered through the church.

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This seems like a strange emblem to have above a church doorway.

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Lovely design on this inset doorway.

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This is where the Indians worked.

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Weaving loom on display.

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Last time we walked here I missed this mural hanging high up on the wall.  It is a WPA era mural that once hung in the Capitol Building at Austin.  “The Pageant of Texas” by artist Harold Everett “Bubi” Jessen.

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They made tequila at the mission.  Plaque explains about it.

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Back on the walk route we head over toward the Presidio.

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We cross the San Antonio River on a highway bridge.

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Ed with the statue of General Ignacio Zaragoza.

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Carol and Ed on the trail.

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Carol detoured to take a picture of the metal cactus with the American and Mexican Flags on the stage of the outdoor amphitheater.

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Approaching the memorial area for the Angel of Goliad and further back the memorial to Fannin and his men.

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Tables and benches that recognize Francisa Alvarez, the “Angel of Goliad” and her descendants.

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Carol and the monument at the grave of Texan Army Col. James Fannin and his men, who were captured at Goliad and executed en masse here on Palm Sunday, 27 Mar 1836, one of the bloodiest days of the Texas War for Independence.

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Ed with one of the two cannons that line the walkway.  The cannons are fixed in place, mounted on concrete pedestals in which the Lone Star flag of Texas is embossed.

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Blooming Century Plant in front of Presidio La Bahia.  It is a Spanish fort originally built in 1749.  It is not part of Goliad State Park and it requires an additional admission price to enter.

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We went inside this time to look around.

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Inside the walls of the old fortress.

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You would sit or kneel to use the gun ports.  Sure couldn’t stand like this for long to shoot.

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One end of the fortress has open access so you can visit.

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Looking down on the church from the fortress wall.

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Not much room in the little guard station.

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There is a grave near the church entrance.

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Inside the church.  This is an active church where they hold services.

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The old bell on display.

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This is a new door made from pattern of what remained of the old door.

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This is all the remains of the old door.

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Flag flying in the fortress compound.

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Flags flying outside as we leave.  Apparently Texas has had nine flags flying over it not the six the “Six Flags” leads you to believe.

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View of the trail as we head back to our car.

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This building is on the NRHP.

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The hanging tree.

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About walktx

I am an avid Volksmarcher. I belong to Texas County Walkers in Mesquite.
This entry was posted in day hike, family fun, Photo Journal, Texas, Urban Hike, volksmarching, walking tour and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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